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Steven Culp on "Stargate Atlantis"

Episode: Miller's Crossing

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"Stargate Atlantis" Captures featuring Steven Culp
"Stargate Atlantis" Trading Card featuring Steven Culp
"Stargate Atlantis" Promotion Pictures featuring Steven Culp
Transcript of Audio Commentary on "Stargate Atlantis" - "Miller's Crossing"

(August 21, 2008, scifihobby.com)
On September 24, 2008, Rittenhouse Archives Ltd. will release two new sets of trading cards for Stargate Atlantis. Each box of the Stargate: Atlantis Seasons Three and Four Trading Cards will contain two autograph cards per box and two costume cards.

Among the autograph cards will be a card featuring Steven Culp as Henry Wallace!

(July 2, 2008, denofgeek.com, Stargate Atlantis season 4 review, by Carl England)
Miller's Crossing is one of these episodes. In truth it's a follow up to McKay and Mrs Miller of the third season, as it focuses on the relationship between Rodney and his sister. Rodney's sister Jeanie, played by Kate Hewlett, is captured and taken hostage, and Rodney, trying to help, comes back to earth to try and find out why. It doesn't go so well, as he is captured too. Fortunately, the villain of the story has a heart, and the reason he kidnaps them is because they are the only people who can save his daughter. As such, it's hard to do, and it creates some interesting conflict and desperate humour between the two main characters. As well as this, Steven Culp does a great job as the kidnapper, as he does a great job of convincing you that not only is he serious, he is also not a bad guy at heart.

(January 2008, gateworld.net, Excerpt from the interview: Becoming Jean - GateWorld talks with Kate Hewlett, by David Read)
Kate Hewlett: It's a great group of people. I've really only worked with David and Amanda. In my second episode it was mostly with Henry Wallace.

David Read: Yeah, what a great actor that is. Steven Culp.

Kate Hewlett: Oh, don't even get me started. He's amazing. He's amazing. He was just incredible to work with, and a lovely person. I'm actually still in contact with him. It's nice when that happens, when you work with someone and you really click. I'm determined to write a part for him, because I think he's the most interesting man.

He's such a good actor and he has so much going on in his face. He can do so little and there's so much going on in his eyes, and I find that really fascinating to watch. He also is a really hard worker. There were so many notes in his script, for every single scene. The kind of work people often do in theatre, he does that on his TV and film scripts as well.

David Read: Yeah. He really wants to get it right.

Kate Hewlett: And he also gets the giggles. Like I do. Which I appreciated! It's terrible. We had a terrible problem with that.

David Read: How would you rate "Miller's Crossing" against "McKay and Mrs. Miller?" Which was the more enjoyable [episode] and which do you prefer to watch?

Kate Hewlett: That's a tough question. I think they're extremely different. I thought the first one was more of an establishing episode for the relationship between the two characters. There's a lot more humor in the first one. In ["Miller's Crossing"] there was a lot more action, which I think the fans probably appreciate. There was a little bit of banter but it didn't dominate the episode.

[...]

Kate Hewlett: Yeah, "If we can survive! And the nanites don't mean that I die."

David Read: Yeah, exactly. Now Rodney, who doesn't have children, was far more interested in escaping, while Jean was genuinely concerned for the young woman's health. Now given the situation, which side could you relate to more?

Hewlett believed strongly in a connection between Jean and the tormented Henry Wallace.
Kate Hewlett: Who knows what I would do in the actual situation? I'd probably be out of there so fast. I don't know. But in my ideal world, if I was the person I hope I am I would have stayed, I think. I understand that. I felt a lot of sympathy for Henry Wallace, and again, maybe that's because Steven Culp has those sad blue eyes. But I think there's a lot of pain in that character. He didn't seem like a bad guy. He seemed like a good guy. He was going about things the wrong way.

David Read: Well he lost his wife, and now he's losing his child. At his wits end! The resolution to that episode was a stirring one for many Atlantis fans. Sheppard guilts himself into sacrificing himself to a Wraith by using pictures of Jean's family. Many fans have different opinions to this. What's yours?

Kate Hewlett: I thought it was great. It was dark and it was surprising. It was vibrant.

David Read: Yeah, it was very different.

Kate Hewlett: Oh yeah. And I think he wasn't necessarily guilting him into it. My take on it was Henry Wallace wouldn't have lived very long anyway. He was completely broken and he lost everything that was important to him.

David Read: I think there was a connection between Jeannie and Wallace.

Kate Hewlett: I think there was a definite connection there. The only thing he could do to make his life worth something was to give something back. So I felt it was actually very clever. Sheppard barely even had to mention it, and he agreed. So I really liked that. I thought that was nice. I like those darker moments on Atlantis.


Editor's note: Steven does not have blue eyes. He has hazel eyes.

(December 17, 2007, gateworld.com, 'Miller's Crossing' earns 1.0 rating by Darren Sumner)
Ratings for the ninth new episode of Stargate Atlantis dropped slightly from the previous new episode, on November 30. "Miller's Crossing" earned a 1.0 average household rating (Live + Same Day) after the Thanksgiving break, down one-tenth of a point from "The Seer."

The episode guest starred Stephen Culp (Desperate Housewives) and Kate Hewlett.

(December 4, 2007, geos.tv, Henry Wallace Character profile)
Henry Wallace was the CEO of Devlin Medical Technologies, a firm that developed medical technologies from the advanced alien technologies brought back by the SGC. Despite the SGC's cover story, Henry was suspicious and discovered where the technolgy was really coming from. Then his daughter Sharon was diagnosed with cancer. After losing his wife three years earlier, Henry was unwilling to ignore his extra knowledge, and he used his resources to rush development of nanite technology from the Pegasus galaxy. His staff failed to get the technology working, so he kidnapped Jeannie Miller and Rodney McKay in an attempt to force them to develop the cure. As incentive, he injected Jeannie witht he nanites. In the end the technology failed, Henry was arrested by the SGC, and Sharon died. As his final act, Henry sacrificed himself to feed a wraith prisoner who could finish developing the technology in time to save Jeannie.

(December 4, 2007, criticalmyth.com: Review Stargate Atlantis: Miller's Crossing, by John Keegan)
Last season's "McKay and Mrs. Miller" introduced Kate Hewitt (David's real-life sister) as McKay's equally brilliant sister Jeannie. Despite the potential criticism for the inherent nepotism, the episode worked very well and gave the writers an opportunity to show a different side of Rodney (or Meredith, if one prefers). This episode is both a follow-up to that earlier installment and a good continuation to "The Seer".

Frankly, I was worried that the writers would slip into familiar patterns and drop the ball on the whole Replicator code plot thread, despite the obvious urgency. Instead, finding a solution to that problem was the logical hook into this particular tale. It makes sense for McKay to recruit any and all help available, and his sister is a reasonable choice.

The focus on the potential medical applications for the Replicator nanites was also a nice touch. Not only did it serve as a compelling complication for this episode, but it served to remind the audience of Weir's situation among the Asurans. One would expect that this reminder is more than just a coincidence, considering that the mid-season cliffhanger is right around the corner.

Stephen Culp is a great actor, and he brings some dramatic heft to what could have been a paper-thin role. In fact, I found myself just as interested in his character as the usual suspects. Without straying too far from thoughts on the episode itself, I must admit that I was considering how well he would work on other shows whenever he was on-screen. Imagine a guest appearance on "Torchwood", with Culp and Barrowman facing off for a while!

The episode structure is actually quite deep, and there are some stunning questionable moral choices along the way. McKay is caught in the most obvious moral dilemma. Having been kidnapped to save someone's life against his will, he is forced to use the Wraith from the previous episode in much the same way, and he knows it. That makes the interaction with the Wraith a lot more interesting, as McKay runs through a list of justifications a mile long, all the while knowing how ineffectual they are.

Of course, that's nothing compared to Sheppard's decision to allow the Wraith to feed on a human "volunteer" to save Jeannie's life. Sheppard holds on to his justification at the end of the episode like a lifeline, and it definitely rocks McKay back on his heels a little. The episode comes down to several characters making questionable choices for the right reasons, and that kind of depth is greatly appreciated.

(December 1, 2007, tvsquad.com: Review Stargate Atlantis: Miller's Crossing, by Richard Keller)
Well, that wasn't what I expected. When I saw that Meredith and his sister Jeannie were going to be kidnapped this episode I thought that it would be some light-hearted romp with the two of them bickering back and forth while they tried to get past the inept kidnappers. Boy, was I wrong! While there were some light touches between McKay and Mrs. Miller this was a pretty serious episode that dealt with some heavy ethical issues.

One of these issues involved stealing classified alien technology from a military organization. This is what Henry Wallace of Devlin Medical Technologies did to try and save his daughter. How did Wallace know about the nannites that McKay and his team on Atlantis were working on? Apparently, DMT provides the subcutaneous transmitters to the Stargate program and Wallace was smart enough to put two and two together to find out about the nannites.

So, did this give him the right to try untested technology to save his daughter? It was a honest gesture, but he was way out of line. Yes, I know people use experimental drugs all of the time to cure diseases such as cancer, but those treatments can be controlled in many cases. In this situation little tiny machines that were uncontrollable caused more harm then good.

I couldn't really feel for Henry in this situation. If he had just kidnapped the two McKays then quickly let them go I would have probably felt a bit of sympathy towards him. However, that all changed after he injected the problem nannites into Jeannie as blackmail for her and Rodney to complete their task. Jeannie was really the innocent during this whole situation and didn't deserve the treatment that she got.

On a side note, is Devlin Medical Technologies a subsidiary of Devlin Pharmaceuticals, which was featured in the 1993 film version of The Fugitive? If so, the government should really start investigating them as soon as possible for unethical practices.

Another ethical issue that popped up was whether to use an enemy to help cure a loved one. Seeing that this was practically a continuation of the previous episode's Wraith/Replicator/Nannite storyline I shouldn't have been surprised when the Wraith showed up at SGC to help McKay reprogram the nannites. I really feel that Rodney had no choice in the matter. McKay is freakishly smart (not as smart as Jeannie, apparently), but the Wraith is faster. I guess that the Wraith really had no choice either since his hive ship was gone and he was persona non grata amongst his own race.

This brings us to our third ethical issue: how far do you go to get your enemy to help cure a loved one. Since the Wraith needed to feed in order to continue working on the project a decision had to be made as to who the victim was to be. Rodney was pretty noble to sacrifice himself for his sister. Luckily, Sheppard had a better idea -- get Wallace to do it. I would have been a bit appalled if Shep tried to force Henry to sacrifice himself for Jeannie. That would have made him no better then some of the races they have encountered. Wallace volunteering to be the feedee was redemption for the character.

For the most part I enjoyed this week's episode of Stargate Atlantis. I thought the first part was a bit slow, but it did give Jeannie and McKay some time to snip at each other. I liked their conversation about Rodney's love life and her statement that he was no John Sheppard. The second half of the show was better as it incorporated the Wraith and his issues into the plot around saving Jeannie.

Since this was pretty much a McKay solo effort the rest of the Atlantis crew was very underutilized. Other than briefly seeing Zelenka at the beginning of the episode the only other team members featured were Shep and Ronon, and Ronon barely had any moments on screen.

(November 30, 2007, stargate-sg1-solutions.com, Miller's Crossing": Consequences Hit Homem by DeeKayP)
The last episode of Stargate Atlantis, "The Seer", presented the Atlantis Expedition with some of the dire consequences of their actions, and laid a heavy burden on the decision makers by allowing them a glimpse of a possibily catastrophic immediate future. It's hard to predict what brings that ill-fated future to fruition, but Dr. Rodney McKay realized that his personal actions had more of an effect than he ever realized at the time he made his decision to reactivate both the nanites in Elizabeth Weir and the Wraith attack commands in the Pegasus Replicators.

Even with this lesson, in tonight's episode, "Miller's Crossing", written by Martin Gero, Rodney contacts his sister Jeanie to help with the programming of the nanite technology, and it is because of her involvement that she gets kidnapped from her very own bed in her home in Vancouver.

Henry Wallace wants to save his daughter from a fatal disease. He's aware of the McKays' e-mail correspondence concerning the alien nanite technology through his position in a medical technology firm contracted by the government and sees that Jeanie has a better grasp on the healing capabilities of the technology than Rodney. But, getting both McKays to work together is a bonus, as he takes his opportunity to capture Rodney as Rodney attempts to rescue his sister. This situation once again reminds Rodney that his actions have far-reaching consequences that even he could never have begun to calculate.

"Miller's Crossing" is not only about nanite technology, but chemistry, according to script coordinator Alex Levine in his scifi.com blog. The chemistry to which he was referring had to do with that between actors: "The character Henry Wallace is played by Stephen [sic] Culp of Desperate Housewives fame. According to David Hewlett, Culp and Kate Hewlett (David's real and on-screen sister) have great chemistry, great repartee. And I concur. It's a fast paced episode which you'll enjoy. I also love seeing David and Kate work together. You get the feeling their real life relationship is a lot like what we're seeing (whether it actually is or not!)."

Even executive producer Joseph Mallozzi identified this episode as having "that incredibly angsty McKay-Sheppard scene" in his personal blog, so it is possible that more actor chemistry will be evident tonight. But why is McKay so angsty? Fan speculation has that Jeanie meets an untimely death, to which Mallozzi responded, "No comment." Tune in tonight at 10pm Eastern on the Sci Fi Channel to find how far the consequences go.

(November 26, 2007, Entertainment Weekly online: A Daily Guide to Notable Shows, Nov 30 Tonight's Best)
Stargate: Atlantis - Steven Culp (Desperate Housewives) plays a mad scientist. Actually, he's pretty cool on the science, mad re: everything else.

(November 25, 2007, (c) MGM published promotion pictures of the episode "Miller's Crossing")

(November 6, 2007, Q&A with Kate Hewlett at the Creation Stargate SG-1 and Atlantis Con, Secaucus, New Jersey 11/3-11/4/07)
"She said she just did a second episode of SGA with Steven Culp from Desperate Housewives. She and David would be doing a serious scene in it, but they'd keep giggling "It's the guy from Desperate Housewives!!" Then Steven would look at them and start giggling as well."

(August 27, 2007, TV Zone SFX Magazine, #219, Actor David Hewlett Interview)
"We've got Kate back, which I know is going to make a lot of fans happy," enthuses Hewlett. "She had a terrific repartee with Steven Culp, who's done a million things, but is probably best known for playing one of the Husbands on Desperate Housewives. In this Atlantis episode he plays a wonderful villain who isn't really a villain, but more of a guy who does all the wrong things for the right reasons.

"So Steven and Kate got on like a house on fire, and we all had a great time working on this episode. I think the hardest part was keeping a straight face. Kate, Steven and I just lost it on numerous occasions, and we were doing really serious stuff, too," he chuckles.

(August 26, 2007, GateWorld.net, Hewlett talks Season Four changes [of 'Atlantis'], by David Read)
Actor David Hewlett ("Dr. Rodney McKay") recently took time out with TV Zone to discuss some of the changes in the upcoming fourth season of Stargate Atlantis, from leadership in Atlantis to the series itself, the return of both Hewlett and McKay's sister, and the arrival of new villains.

[...]

In addition to villains, some familiar good guys will be returning as well. Kate Hewlett, widely regarded as a favorite of the guest stars in Season Three (as Jeannie Miller, McKay's sister), will return for a second appearance in "Miller's Crossing."

"We've got Kate back, which I know is going to make a lot of fans happy," David tells TV Zone. "She had a terrific repartee with Steven Culp, who's done a million things, but is probably best known for playing one of the Husbands on Desperate Housewives. In this Atlantis episode he plays a wonderful villain who isn't really a villain, but more of a guy who does all the wrong things for the right reasons."

(GateWorld.net)
Summary

After being reunited with his estranged sister Jeannie a year ago ("McKay and Mrs. Miller"), Rodney has been keeping up a correspondence with her back on Earth. Unfortunately, certain powerful people are aware of this -- and use it to lure Jeannie into a trap. Rodney goes looking for her, and the two find themselves captives.

Rodney wakes up in a laboratory on Earth with Jeannie, and the two meet the man behind all of this: Henry Wallace, the president of Devlin Medical Technologies. His company gets a lot of government contracts, and is one of their primary resources for integrating alien technologies acquired by the Stargate Program into Earth's medical technology. Wallace therefore has only the lowest level of access to information -- but after a few too many astounding break-throughs by the military, he has managed to find out all about the S.G.C., Atlantis ... and Rodney McKay.

Soon Wallace shows the two brilliance scientists why he's brought them here: his daughter Sharon, a young woman suffering from leukemia. McKay isn't sure what he wants the two of them to do -- neither are medical doctors. Wallace explains that Sharon has been given prototype nanites to try and heal her, but they are doing more harm than good. She is dying.

(stargate-sg1-solutions.com)
Summary

Henry Wallace kidnaps Jeanie Miller, McKay's sister, which leads to McKay's subsequent capture as well. Wallace knew about the SGC's subcutaneous transponders and disabled McKay's. He had knowledge of this technology because he worked for the company that manufactured them for the SGC, Devlin Medical Technologies. The company was given limited access to alien technology brought to Earth through the Stargate Program, and Wallace eventually put the pieces together after years of witnessing the military's unbelievable technological advances. One of the company's recent projects includes the development of nanotechnology to cure injury and disease. According to McKay, the Devlin Medical has just barely gotten the manufacturing of the nanites perfected and McKay himself was still months away from getting them programmed. Wallace discovered the connection of this nanotechnology to Atlantis and began to monitor McKay's e-mails to Miller. Based on the content of these e-mails, Wallace believed that Miller had a better understanding of the programming than her brother.

Wallace is attempting to save the life of his daughter Sharon, about 18-20 years old, who is close to death with acute lymphocytic leukemia. The doctors have lost hope that she'll survive and advise the family to prepare for her death. Not wishing to see his daughter die, Wallace worked on the nanite technology and implanted it into his daughter, but her body began to reject the foreign bodies. He hopes that Miller and McKay can reprogram the nanites in time to save his daughter's life.

(August 6, 2007, SyFy Portal, 'Enterprise's' Major Hayes Heads To 'Atlantis', by Alan Stanley Blair)
Fans of the genre may remember him as Major Hayes on "Star Trek: Enterprise," but in the fall the actor Steven Culp will be trading his starship for a Stargate as he heads to the lost city of the Ancients in "Stargate: Atlantis."

According to Gateworld, Culp will be seen in the ninth episode of the series, entitled "Millers Crossing," which sees Rodney McKay (David Hewlett) and his sister Jeannie (played by his real-life sister Kate Hewlett) kidnapped by a shadowy medical corporation on Earth. The corporation is said to be the main government contractor that has interfaced with alien technology received through the Stargate program.

Since the cancellation of it's parent series "Stargate SG-1," producers say that "Atlantis" will get the chance to tell more Earth-based stories that they could not previously do without stepping on a few toes. The means for the Earth-based stories was introduced in the third season with the construction of the space-gate network that stretches between galaxies, replacing the need for a ZPM (zero-point module) to open a single wormhole.

It's not yet clear who Culp will play on the series or if he will have a recurring role with the show after this episode, however Gateworld has put its money on the actor having a fairly integral role in the episode. On "Enterprise," Culp played M.A.C.O leader Major Hayes for the third season for its season-long Xindi arc. Since then, he has also appeared in "JAG," "ER" and "Desperate Housewives."

For the fourth season, "Atlantis" will be making its debut at the slightly later timeslot of 10 p.m. to make way for the flood of new shows making their debut. The move will also allow the series to tell slightly darker tales which the 9 p.m. timeslot would not allow.

New episodes of "Stargate: Atlantis" returns to the SciFi Channel on Sept. 28.

(August 4, 2007, SourceGate.org, Steven Culp To Be In Stargate Atlantis Season 4, by Tucker)
Steven Culp better known to Sci-Fi fans for his role on Star Trek: Enterprise in Season 3 ("The Xindi", "The Shipment", "Harbinger", "Hatchery", "Countdown") as Major Hayes, Commander of the M.A.C.O's. As well as his appearance in Desperate Housewives as Rex Van De Kapm married to Bree Hodge and also has stared in other top TV shows such as 24 and ER.

Steven Culp will be making an appearance in Stargate Atlantis's Season 4 episode "Miller's Crossing" with Rodney McKay (David Hewlett) and his sister Jeannie McKay (Kate Hewlett) who are kidnapped by Henry Wallace who is the head of medical technologies corporation that the Government uses to integrate alien technologies procured by the Stargate Program into new Earth medicines. However it is not as of yet confirmed who Steven Culp will be portraying but speculation would point to him portraying Henry Wallace.

(August 4, 2007, GateWorld.net, Steven Culp to guest star on Atlantis, by Darren Sumner)
Steven Culp guest stars on Atlantis
Actor Steven Culp will appear in the upcoming episode "Miller's Crossing," executive producer Joseph Mallozzi told fans at his blog today.

Culp is a veteran actor of stage and screen. He played Robert F. Kennedy in the Kevin Costner film "Thirteen Days." On television he played Rex Van De Kamp on Desperate Housewives, and Special Agent Fred Chambers on ABC's Traveler. He has had recurring roles on JAG, The West Wing, 24, E.R. and many others.

Science fiction fans will recognize him as Major Hayes, head of the M.A.C.O.s tactical unit, in the third season of Star Trek: Enterprise.

In the episode, Rodney McKay and his sister Jeannie (guest star Kate Hewlett) are kidnapped by Henry Wallace, the head of a medical technologies corporation that the U.S. government uses to integrate alien technologies procured by the Stargate program into Earth-based medicine.

It is not yet known what character Culp will play, but as a featured character in the episode Wallace is a good bet.

"Miller's Crossing" is expected to air as the ninth episode of Season Four, which premieres September 28 on SCI FI Channel.

(August 4, 2007, GateWorld.net)
Steven will appear in the episode Miller's Crossing of the SciFi series "Stargate Atlantis" as Henry Wallace. Executive producer Joseph Mallozzi wrote in his blog on August 2nd: "The director's cut of Miller's Crossing came in a little long which will probably mean a scene or two not making the cut - but hopefully finding their way onto a future Deleted Footage Special Feature. By the way, guest star Steven Culp is terrific in this one." Estimated air date is Nov 30, 2007.

(August 2, 2007, josephmallozzi.blogspot.com)
NOW! The director's cut of Miller's Crossing came in a little long which will probably mean a scene or two not making the cut - but hopefully finding their way onto a future Deleted Footage Special Feature. By the way, guest star Steven Culp is terrific in this one.

(July 25, 2007, josephmallozzi.blogspot.com)
After a day of shooting Kindred I, we're shooting the final day of Miller's Crossing, then will be switching back to Kindred I when we return on Monday.

June 15, 2007, 03:38 PM
According to David Hewlett, Miller's Crossing has began filming

(May 31, 2007, stargate-sg1-solutions.com, posted in Atlantis Spoilers by DeeKayP)
SGA S4 Spoilers: Miller's Crossing

Introduction "Miller's Crossing" is currently scheduled to be the ninth episode to air in Season Four of Stargate Atlantis. The episode is written by Martin Gero.

Details Jeanie McKay Miller and Dr. Rodney McKay are kidnapped by Henry Wallace on Earth after Wallace determines that only the McKays can save his daughter's life using alien nanotechnology.

Henry Wallace kidnaps Jeanie Miller, McKay's sister, which leads to McKay's subsequent capture as well. Wallace knew about the SGC's subcutaneous transponders and disabled McKay's. He had knowledge of this technology because he worked for the company that manufactured them for the SGC, Devlin Medical Technologies. The company was given limited access to alien technology brought to Earth through the Stargate Program, and Wallace eventually put the pieces together after years of witnessing the military's unbelievable technological advances. One of the company's recent projects includes the development of nanotechnology to cure injury and disease. According to McKay, the Devlin Medical has just barely gotten the manufacturing of the nanites perfected and McKay himself was still months away from getting them programmed. Wallace discovered the connection of this nanotechnology to Atlantis and began to monitor McKay's e-mails to Miller. Based on the content of these e-mails, Wallace believed that Miller had a better understanding of the programming than her brother.

Wallace is attempting to save the life of his daughter Sharon, about 18-20 years old, who is close to death with acute lymphocytic leukemia. The doctors have lost hope that she'll survive and advise the family to prepare for her death. Not wishing to see his daughter die, Wallace worked on the nanite technology and implanted it into his daughter, but her body began to reject the foreign bodies. He hopes that Miller and McKay can reprogram the nanites in time to save his daughter's life.

In the meantime, Agent Malcolm Barrett, Sgt. Harriman, Sheppard, and Ronon are back at the SGC attempting to find the two missing scientists.

Guest Characters
  • Jeanie Miller (Kate Hewlett)
  • Agent Malcolm Barrett (Peter Flemming)
  • Sgt. Walter Harriman (Gary Jones)
  • Henry Wallace (TBA)
  • Sharon Wallace (TBA)
Production
  • Written by: Martin Gero
  • Stargate Atlantis Season Four episode guide
Spoilers are subject to change as this episode is in production.

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